Thematic Workshops

Author- and Game Agency in Narrative Digital Game-Based Learning

Monday, June 3 10:30h @ Room A

Abstract

Instructional theory has shown narratives to be superior to expository description in fostering learning. Narratives have been suggested to be easier to remember than other instructional materials, as well as to both engage and motivate learners. Reviews of Digital Game-Based Learning (DGBL) point to positive effects on engagement, motivation, and learning. DGBL has been shown to amplify the learning situation and to extend it by offering new learning means and venues.
One might believe that there would be many narrative DGBL that showed consistent positive effects, however, literature reviews and candidate evaluations show mixed and confusing results. There are conclusions across the spectrum that range from positive to detrimental. Practitioners call for better methods for isolating the narratives in DGBL to remove spurious correlations and gain a better understanding of narratives direct effects on engagement, motivation and learning.
The Ludo Narrative Variable Model (LNVM) isolate narratives from game mechanics. LNVM comprises four ontologies, shared by narratives and games, that allow plotting of games from high author- to high game agency. A PhD study at SLATE reviewed 10 years of candidate narrative DGBL studies, plotted them using LNVM, and sorted them based on reported effects, looking for trends between successful and unsuccessful DGBL. The candidates have also been evaluated in terms of gameplay-learning and narrative-learning relationships, to discover how narratives support learning.
In this workshop participants are grouped and will engage in paper-prototyping narrative DGBL design, using plot combinations developed at SLATE. At the start of the session the research is presented. The groups then select a learning objective and target demographic, before the DGBL is described by the groups using the SLATE study data alongside creative tools, before being presented to the other participants.

Speaker

Fredik S. Breien
University of Bergen (Norway)

 

How the Blockchain can shape the future of education

Monday, June 3 14:00h @ Room A

Abstract

The emergence of Blockchain technology promises to revolutionise not only the financial world, but also education in many different ways. Blockchain technology offers opportunities to thoroughly rethink how we find educational content and training services online, how we register and pay for educational content and training services, as well as how we get accredited for what we have learned and how this accreditation affects our career trajectory. This workshop will explore the different aspects of teaching and learning that are affected by this new paradigm. In particular, we will investigate the different scenarios that place the learner at the very centre of the learning process and its associated data via the use of Blockchain technology. More specifically, we will outline the ways that ePortfolios, accreditation, tutoring, as well as other aspects of teaching and learning can evolve within a learner-centred ecosystem based on the Blockchain. Finally, we will discuss the various benefits that this ecosystem ears for teachers and learners.

Speaker

Alexander Mikroyannidis
The Open University (UK)

 

Big Data in TEL

Monday, June 3 16:00h @ Room A

Abstract

The successful outcome of a TEL system depends among other things on the ability to decide which software infrastructure is necessary. Diverse concepts can be found in the domain. Selecting an appropriate solution is not straight forward. In this workshop, an introduction on up to date Big Data technologies and architectures will be given. This introduction will make the participant aware of the potential but also understand the constraints. An exchange of information on the currently used infrastructures by the participants and the community will provide the group with an overview of the state of the art. This overview will be the base of a discussion about the potential use cases of Big Data in TEL.

Speaker

George Ciordas-Hertel
Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education (Germany)

 

Reflection Guidance – State-of-the-art and Challenges in Intelligent mentoring systems

Monday, June 3 16:00h @ Room B

Abstract

Adaptive reflection guidance can be understood as a specific kind of intelligent tutoring systems – as a kind of intelligent mentoring systems, as envisaged by Dimitrova (2006). These systems don’t encode to a very fine-granular degree domain knowledge, and learning strategies, but support the learner in developing the capability to learn in a self-directed manner; and in to learn about a particular learning domain. In this lecture and demo, I will show a concrete modular in-app reflection guidance framework, and its instantiation in different research prototypes (Fessl et al., 2017). I will also discuss how such a system relates to the very wide fields of intelligent tutoring systems and adaptive and context-aware systems in general; inheriting open challenges from each of these fields. In particular, it connects to promising fields of future TEL research in finding the sweet spot between human and artificial intelligence.

Speakers

Angela Fessl
Graz University of Technology (Austria)
Viktoria Pammer-Schindler
Graz University of Technology (Austria)

 

Expertise Modelling using Augmented Reality and sensors for training

Tuesday, June 4 10:30h @ Room A

Abstract

Have you ever attended a seminar or a workshop from one of the experts in your field, expecting to learn what he knows or has to share, only to realize at the end that you are more confused and didn’t really have a lot to
take home? If yes, then this workshop will cruise you across this vast and enticing mind of the experts. We will walk you through the complex dynamics of the knowledge and experience, that gives shape to the expertise that you wished to have had in seminar. The workshop will introduce you to field of the study of expertise, why experts are crucial assets and why is it difficult to be an expert. On top of that, the workshop will focus on why it is difficult to learn from the expert, all while requiring the need of an expert to be an expert. Since, there are fewer experts and developing expertise requires extensive personal coaching from the expert, not all of normal population can afford that. Recent work in the field of expertise study, has had significant amount of work done on modelling the experts, so that experts can train efficiently and effectively. Some researchers, like you will meet in this workshop, have branched from this stem to explore modern sensors and technologies which are becoming more accessible and accurate. This workshop will introduce you to the ongoing works on modelling an expert with sensors for training purposes. You will be introduced to the theoretical and practical challenges of using sensors and augmented reality for modelling and part take in discussions and activities in this field.

Speakers

Bibeg Limbu
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)
Roland Klemke
TH Köln (Germany)

 

Rites of passage: Creating Impactful Scenarios for the Transition in Between Realities in Mixed-Reality

Tuesday, June 4 14:00h @ Room A

Abstract

A majority of virtual (learning) experiences confronts users with a sudden switch from actual reality to virtuality, thus neglecting the moment of transition and the space in between as design opportunity. Mixed Reality technologies however, and the experiences created from them demand for an exploitation of this particular moment of transition that might eventually act as a facilitator to furthering and prolonging desired learning effects in both mobile and stationary experiences. By presenting findings from the creation of our Porta Praetoria MR Smartphone App2, workshop participants will be introduced to chances and challenges of designing inner-diegetic transition scenarios within the reality-virtuality-continuum (P. Milgram and A. F. Kishino, 1994). Drawing on the anthropological three-stage model of the “rites of passage” (van Gennep, 1977) and adopting it with the means of technology as well as the medium’s key affordances: “theme/story”, “environment”, “interaction” and “embodiment”, participants will develop a series of design considerations as first steps towards a methodology for creating powerful entry-, exit- and transition scenarios.

Speakers

Katharina Tillmanns
TH Köln (Germany)
Jonas Zimmer
TH Köln (Germany)
Roland Klemke
TH Köln (Germany)

 

Design And Evaluation in game based learning

Tuesday, June 4 14:00h @ Room B

Abstract

Game-based learning (GBL) offers innovative and engaging ways to educate learners. Researchers need a standardised method for design and evaluation of these type of games. Learning games require a multidisciplinary approach that combines game design, interaction design and instructional design. The objective is to bring together participants with different background to design and evaluate a learning game in a heterogeneous team. This workshop will use LEAGUE Game-based learning framework for design and evaluation of learning game. We will start by providing the knowledge regarding steps in educational game design and evaluation, describe the dimensions, factor/sub-factors and metrics critical for learning games and also the relation between these dimensions in order to understand the game-based learning phenomenon. The participants will apply these concepts during the workshop’s design and evaluation activity sessions. In the design session, participants will be asked to work in groups to come up with an early prototype design for a learning game, the specification of which will be provided by the organizers. To focus the ideas, the games under consideration will fall within the theme of spatial abilities. By the end of the session they will have created early stage prototypes that can be demonstrated at the end of workshop. In evaluation session, they will use framework elements to plan educational game evaluation, create evaluation instrument and use them to evaluate learning games for spatial abilities. At the end of the session they will share the problems identified in existing spatial learning games using their evaluation strategy. The workshop is open to anyone to attend with any level of experience. No prior experience is required.

Speakers

Rabail Tahir
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)
Serena Lee-Cultura
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)

 

Immersive TEL in Higher Education: integration challenge

Tuesday, June 4 16:00h @ Hall

Abstract

Digitalization and digital competencies are going to play increasingly important role in pedagogical practice. Immersive technologies, such as Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Mixed Reality, are becoming an important part of the technological toolkit of teachers and trainers. The interest in the teacher community for applying these technologies is very high. However, the teachers are lacking the necessary competences for using existing immersive-tech Open Educational Resources, adapting them to the curricula and designing own resources. Therefore, the main objective of this workshop is to brainstorm methods, procedures and recommendations for competence development of applying immersive technologies in higher education settings, such as classroom or lab.

Speakers

Ekaterina Prasolova-Førland
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)
Mikhail Fominykh
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)

 

The Trialogical Approach: learning through shared objects and technologies

Tuesday, June 4 16:00h @ Room A

Abstract

In the current society, educational systems play a central role in the direction of promoting responsible and competent citizens. To reach this goal, students should be enabled to acquire and develop the so-called knowledge work skills: individual (e.g., metacognitive skills and ICT skills), social (e.g., networking and communications) and epistemic (e.g., critical thinking, information management). Equipped whit those skills students should become able to act in constantly changing situations, in an uncertain world and unknown future, facing incomplete and imperfect results (Biesta 2009; Johansson, Kopciwicz, and Dahlgren 2008), and carrying on a reflexive attitude oriented towards a long-life learning (Delors 1997). Supporting the development of knowledge work skills implies the need for educational agencies to review curricula and pedagogical practices, as also highlighted by the international community (OECD 2013). The purpose of this workshop is to present a theoretical approach able to meet these indications: the Trialogic Approach (TLA) (Paavola &Hakkareinen, 2005). TLA integrates and combines three elements: the monological approach (centered on the processes of individual knowledge), the dialogical approach (centered on distributed cognition and social interactions), and the knowledge creation metaphor (centered on the production of shared artefacts, whish are useful to the community). Trialogic activities allow students to increase their skills, competences and knowledge, while developing or improving concrete artefacts, combining individual and collective goals. Within the TLA, technologies mediate the process of reification and the improvement of ideas and are chosen in order to guarantee real collaboration and interdependence. After having illustrated TLA theoretical implications and design principles, participants will be asked to concretely apply and experience them through a small-group activity: supported by devices and applications, each group should produce a shared artifact, following TLA indications. Finally, a plenary discussion will focus on the processes and outputs of the activity.

Speakers

Nadia Sansone
University Unitelma Sapienza (Italy)
Rosa Di Maso
University of Parma (Italy)

 

Multimodal Tutor

Thursday, June 6 10:30h @ Room A

Abstract

Human anatomy and cognitive abilities have developed through physical interactions with objects and with other living creatures. Experiences that involve multiple senses, such as touch, smell, visuals, sounds or flavours, are inevitably more meaningful and authentic for the learner. The idea of ‘multimodality’ consists of segmenting and analysing the interaction of learners with the physical world. Today it is possible to capture fine-grained traces of the learning process with wearable sensors, Internet of Things devices and high-frequency data collection technologies, that we call ‘multimodal data’. Through signal processing, machine learning and experience sampling it is possible to use multimodal data to tailor personalised multisensorial feedback. Such feedback could steer the learner to optimise learning goals attainment or skills acquisition.

Speakers

Daniele Di Mitri
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)
Jan Schneider
Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education (Germany)

 

Learning analytics design in game-based learning

Thursday, June 6 14:00h (Part I) & 16:00h (Part II) @ Hall

Abstract

Digital games are an integral part of the younger generations and they spend a lot of time playing games in- and out-of-school. These systems can generate rich data which can be used to make inferences about what and how students are learning. Many of the constructs that can be measured in games are potentially very hard to grasp by teachers using traditional assessment methods. Therefore, learning analytics holds the potential to unlock valuable information of numerous student’s abilities connected to lifelong learning, such as creativity, productive struggle, persistence, and experimentation. However, the intrinsic multidisciplinary nature of learning games, together their frequent open-ended environments, can make very challenging to design games that can actually be used to make valid and actionable inferences through learning analytics. In this workshop we will provide an overview of the topic and of our design process, and then we will have participants practice how to design learning games and data infrastructure that can be aligned to conduct learning analytics research.

Speakers

José A. Ruipérez-Valiente
MIT (USA)
Yoon Jeon Kim
MIT (USA)

 

Creating Storified Online Courses

Thursday, June 6 16:00h @ Room A

Abstract

As a teacher it can be hard to create compelling educational online courses. Often, educators of such courses have lots of expert knowledge but comparingly few pedagogical expertise. Learning materials are interesting, but rarely connected to each other and often not adapted to the students’ needs. Narratives can help structuring course materials while making them more interesting and easier to understand for the learners. It can not only help to improve lectures but also exercises.
In this workshop, a framework will be presented that can help teachers to apply a narrative to already existing online courses. It will also help teachers to determine suitable types of exercises according to the learning goals of each learning unit.
Participants can try out the framework as part of a team exercise. In this exercise, every participant has a different task he will focus on – create content with expert knowledge, add interesting narratives, apply pedagogy, or make sure the learner view is not missed out. For the framework, different questions on target group, learning goals and content have to be answered so suggested narratives and exercise types will suit the course.
After all groups presented their results, participants will have some extra time to test the framework again just by themselves, now aware of all the different aspects of creating storified online courses. Afterwards, participants will give feedback on their experience with the framework.
The framework development is in early stage and is therefore paper based in this workshop. With the participants’ feedback, the framework will be improved and developed as a standalone application afterwards. Thus, the decisions made will be more flexible with the application than with just a paper framework.

Speaker

Christiane Hagedorn
Hasso Plattner Institute (Germany)

 

Portable co-located collaboration support in real-time

Thursday, June 6 17:30h @ Hall

Abstract

Collaboration is an important skill in the 21st Century. It can take place in co-located or remote settings in different scenarios like programming, problem solving, project meetings, etc. Audio is the ubiquitous modality during Co-located Collaboration (CC) in most of these scenarios. Previously, many works have used multiple non-lexical audio features like total speaking time, pitch, synchrony of amplitude, number of interruptions to detect the quality of CC. But, none of these studies have tackled the problem of giving an automated real-time feedback to facilitate collaboration in real-time. A few studies have gone to the extent of using human moderators to detect the quality of CC and made a provision for giving a human-driven real-time feedback while most have focused on post-hoc detection of the collaboration quality.
We use some of these indicators during the audio conversations in a collaborative activity and test the design of our automated real-time feedback setup by deploying it during the collaborative activity. Later our plan is to collect the feedback from the participants to improve the real-time feedback mechanism in future iterations. The knowledge gained from this workshop can also help the participants to use this real-time feedback during their group meetings or group activities and facilitate CC. As the system design is portable, so it can be easily adapted in any group setting and help the members during the group activities.

Speakers

Sambit Praharaj
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)
Maren Scheffel
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)

 

Introduction to Constructionism and Learning-by-Making

Thursday, June 6 17:30h @ Room A

Abstract

Coming soon.

Speakers

Anna Vasilchenko
Newcastle University (UK)
Megan Venn-Wycherley
Newcastle University (UK)

 

OurTown

Friday, June 7 10:30h @ Room A

Abstract

OurTown is a mobile application being developed with support from the Erasmus+ programme designed to link learning in the school with learning in the community. OurTown is based on learning challenges grouped into learning trails in local communities, including shops, businesses, parks and museums. Challenges can be developed around different subjects, e.g. science, history, ecology, around careers or just about the local community. The trails and challenges are accessed through QR codes by learners through a mobile app. They are developed by teachers or by members of community organisations and attached to the codes using a computer application.
The workshop will include a brief introduction to the use of mobile applications for learning in the community and the concept behind OuTown. In the hands on workshop participants will develop their own QR code learning trail, around the site of the summer school. Other summer school participants will be invited to follow the learning trail and complete the challenges.
Workshop participants will be invited to provide feedback and contribute their own ideas as to how the OurTown idea and application might be further developed for use in their own research. They will also be invited to reflect on the potential of mobile learning technologies to promote informal and community based learning.

Speakers

Graham Attwell
Pontydysgu (UK)
Angela Gerrard
Pontydysgu (UK)
George Bekiaridis
Active Citizens Partnership (Greece)

 

Introductory Epistemic Network Analysis Workshop

Friday, June 7 10:30h @ Room B

Abstract

Epistemic Network Analysis (ENA) is an innovative method for modeling and comparing the structure of connections between elements in coded data. ENA both visualizes data as networks and enables a statistical comparison of the networks. ENA has been used to explore the communication patterns of trauma teams, to analyze the eye-tracking data during collaborative learning, and to visualize competencies and topics across grades in a mathematics curriculum, just to name a few examples.
In the workshop you will to learn the basics of ENA by analyzing two Shakespeare plays: Rome and Juliet and Hamlet. After the workshop you will know how to use the ENA web tool independently, and how to develop and interpret ENA graphs.
The workshop consists three parts:

  • theoretical (explaining the ENA, step-by-step)
  • tutorial (introducing you to the features of the ENA web tool), and
  • group work (put your new acquired skills into practice)

For the workshop you just need to bring your laptop and have an Internet connection. The datasets and other materials will be sent per email before the workshop; please download these onto your laptop.
If you want extra background information on ENA before the workshop, watch David Williamson Shaffer’s keynote from LAK’18 (not obligatory).

Speaker

Kamila Misiejuk
University of Bergen (Norway)

 

Designing Learning Activities for Ubiquitous Digital Devices

Friday, June 7 14:00h @ Room A

Abstract

The utilization of Massive Open Online Courses is omnipresent in today’s world. The provided learning material can often be accessed by desktop computer, notebooks, tablets, and smartphones in order to offer freedom in the learners’ own learning process. Furthermore, modern digital devices, like smart TVs, smart speakers, and smartwatches, receive increased acceptance as they continue to improve our daily routines through convenience functionality. Whereas the use of tablets and smartphones for learning activities become more and more established, research and applications that incorporate these new devices do not exist.
Supporting successful learning with those modern devices is not a trivial task as new challenges arise. Similar to the smaller screen sizes of mobiles devices, learning activities need to be adapted to the different interaction patterns. Nevertheless, the utilization of such devices provides new opportunities to design more personalized learning experiences by integrating learning activities in daily routines.
In this workshop, the participants will explore these modern devices by examining their interaction patterns, workflows and feedback mechanisms in the context of TEL research. Furthermore, they will iterate over possible learning activity designs, which incorporate characteristic features of the smart devices. Afterward, the participants will create low-fidelity prototypes to showcase their findings and to originate discussions.

Speakers

Max Bothe
Hasso Plattner Institute (Germany)
Tobias Rohloff
Hasso Plattner Institute (Germany)

 

Am I planning smart? – Exploring learning cycles

Friday, June 7 14:00h @ Room B

Abstract

Setting meaningful goals is an important part of self-regulated learning (SRL). Learning goals are used for learning planning and enable learners to draw conclusions from the learning process. Formulating goals is not a straightforward task, which is why we present a smart learning goal guideline. The workshop will start exposing and discussing the opportunities of SRL. Then it will continue with a set of exercises where participants will formulate their own meaningful SRL goals.

Speakers

Sebastian Wollny
Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education (Germany)
Jan Schneider
Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education (Germany)

 

Culturally sensitive learning analytics tools

Friday, June 7 16:00h @ Room A

Abstract

Learning Analytics (LA) has gained a lot of attention in the last years as more and more data about learners and their contexts became available. Thus, the number of LA tools has been steadily on the rise, but the majority of them follow the ‘one size fits all’ paradigm, deploying the same tool to all its users regardless of their individual differences. Among other personal characteristics like age, gender, level of education or skills, it has been shown that cultural differences can influence learning and teaching in traditional classrooms as well as in an online environment.
The workshop activities are grounded in Hofstede’s framework for describing cultural differences between nations, especially with regards to teaching and learning3. Throughout the workshop, we will review and apply this framework in the context of student-facing learning analytics, focusing on answering the following questions:

  • Do learners from different cultures face different challenges when interacting with the same learning technology?
  • Do learning analytics tools introduce new challenges for learners through their interface design?
  • Can variations in the design of learning analytics minimize these challenges?
  • What challenges do learning technologists face when designing learning tools for the global learner?

Speakers

Ioana Jivet
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)
Ekaterina Muravyeva
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)

 

Learn to fight irrational fears with data driven approaches

Friday, June 7 16:00h @ Room B

Abstract

Individual fears and feelings or perceptions of unsafety do not always match the real safety situation (Cho et al, 2009). Fears may lead to irrational decisions and behaviour, such as avoiding certain places at certain times,
although looking at factual data it is not more dangerous than at other places. Amongst possible reasons for these irrational decisions are that perceptions were based on incomplete or wrong data, wrongly interpreted data, or missing awareness about existing data and no chance to compare these perceptions against trustworthy data.
The recently started FearFighter project aims to address selected aspects of safety and will, through a design research approach, develop mobile technology to support individuals in rational decision making. This is supported by raising individuals’ awareness for data in relation to safety (available data sources, reliable data sources, interpretation of data, safety issues involved with data) and by providing reflection support to compare these data with their perceptions. The project pilots a digital solution for involving and educating citizens about safety aspects in a data-driven way. Within this conceptual workshop, we aim to present initial ideas of the FearFighter project and collaboratively explore some of its key aspects, including:

  • Which irrational fears can be identified in relation to (smart) cities and their citizens?
  • What are known or assumed causes for irrational fears?
  • Which data sources are available in (smart) cities, that can potentially show the disbalance between irrational fears and rational risks?
  • How could/should information about irrational fears and rational risks be communicated/visualised in order to help reducing the discrepancy?
  • How can citizens be activated as “data providers” to collect data about risks and safety in environments they inhabit or move through, to support the above?

Speakers

Roland Klemke
TH Köln (Germany)
Ellen Rusman
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)
Somayeh Zamani
Open University of the Netherlands (NL)